a rumination:

Oct 18

keep going

Cara

Cara

itwonlast:

The Economist’s “White Out of Red” campaign (1988 - today)
Based around the Economist’s masthead, the concept is the creation of the agency Abbot Mead Vickers. Voted into the D&AD Annual and winning the Poster Award’s Best Media Poster category, the first poster (‘Management Trainee’) was the start of a hugely successful and still ongoing campaign.
Rather than advertising content as most of the competition did, the strategy was to play on the cachet of reading The Economist – “if you were a reader, you were part of an exclusive club of successful people. The price of admission was the price of the magazine. The creative guidelines insisted that the tone of the advertising reflect the personality of the club – clever, urbane – with an undercurrent of wit to move the brand away from its somewhat stuffy image.” The Economist would be a polarizing brand — either you get it, or you don’t. The point of the campaign was not to sell copies of The Economist but to make people feel like they ought to say they read it.
Over twenty years on since the first poster, the message behind the advertisements has lost none of its punch, whilst the campaign won a plethora of awards and has become legendary. (via)

itwonlast:

The Economist’s “White Out of Red” campaign (1988 - today)

Based around the Economist’s masthead, the concept is the creation of the agency Abbot Mead Vickers. Voted into the D&AD Annual and winning the Poster Award’s Best Media Poster category, the first poster (‘Management Trainee’) was the start of a hugely successful and still ongoing campaign.

Rather than advertising content as most of the competition did, the strategy was to play on the cachet of reading The Economist – “if you were a reader, you were part of an exclusive club of successful people. The price of admission was the price of the magazine. The creative guidelines insisted that the tone of the advertising reflect the personality of the club – clever, urbane – with an undercurrent of wit to move the brand away from its somewhat stuffy image.” The Economist would be a polarizing brand — either you get it, or you don’t. The point of the campaign was not to sell copies of The Economist but to make people feel like they ought to say they read it.

Over twenty years on since the first poster, the message behind the advertisements has lost none of its punch, whilst the campaign won a plethora of awards and has become legendary. (via)

(via nickelcobalt)

Crushes don’t last as long as they used to. Perhaps it’s a side effect of age but the rush that often accompanies a romantic encounter dissipates with each one that follows. As the novelty wanes, you piece together as much information about the experience as you decide — it’s learning.

Words function similarly. Like people, they have their own histories, contexts, sights, and sounds. Like relationships, currently known words aid in or obstruct the learning of new ones.

This journal, while a document of the words I encounter in seeing, reading, speaking, and listening, is for the purpose of discovering and defining the very language that connects and divides, uncovers and deceives, amazes and confuses.

To current projects: may they be the scaffolding that supports future ones. 

— the title page of an abandoned language project, August 2013

(Source: fuckeverythingbecomeapirate, via nickelcobalt)

Jake

Jake

status life

high-lowbrow:

the entire pattern of behavior and possessions through which people express their position in the world or what they think it is or what they hope it to be.

- tom wolfe

Oct 14

(Source: gabe-kelley)

claytoncotterell:

I’m open

claytoncotterell:

I’m open

mentaltimetraveller:

Conor Backman

mentaltimetraveller:

Conor Backman

(via notational)

northmagneticpole:

Freunde Von Freunden

northmagneticpole:

Freunde Von Freunden

(Source: freundevonfreunden.com)

inforealm:

Brian Calvin
Oh Me, 2004
Acrylic on canvas
61 x 45.7 cm

inforealm:

Brian Calvin

Oh Me, 2004

Acrylic on canvas

61 x 45.7 cm

(via missannavaldez)

(Source: arneau)

Oct 10